Monday, September 29, 2014

Wolf Sighting in Emmet County

Monica T
Petoskey, Michigan

Date of Sighting: Saturday, September 27, 2014
Time of Sighting: 11:30 A.M. and 12:15 P.M.

Emmet County

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Wolf Sighting in Ionia County

Jean G
Ionia, MI

Date of Sighting: Sunday, September 28, 2014
Time of Sighting: 9:30 am

Ionia County

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Wolf Sighting in Oakland County

Cynthia M
Milford, MI

Date of Sighting: Wednesday, September 24, 2014
Time of Sighting: 7:20am

Oakland County

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Wolf Sighting in Ogemaw County

Nick C
Prescott, Michigan

Date of Sighting: Wednesday, September 24, 2014
Time of Sighting: 6:00pm

Ogemaw County

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Legislators, activists, engaged in battle over fate of Michigan wolf hunting

The debate of whether to hunt gray wolves in Michigan can be heard everywhere, stretching from the northernmost tip of the Upper Peninsula to the southeastern suburbs of Detroit.

It’s an argument that has grown more ferocious and divided with time, and one that likely won’t be settled anytime soon.

Are gray wolves deadly and a serious nuisance, or majestic and simply misunderstood?

Should the Michigan Legislature decide on the future of wolf hunts, or should it be a vote of the people?

These questions, and ensuing years-long arguments, have boiled to the point of upcoming ballot referendums and new legislation in Lansing.

Two wolf hunt laws, which initiated the first legal gray wolf hunting season in 40 years last autumn, have been challenged by two referendums that will appear on the Nov. 4 ballot. The referendums will ask voters to endorse or overturn the laws, which permit wolf hunting.

Legislators, activists, engaged in battle over fate of Michigan wolf hunting

Monday, September 22, 2014

Wolf Sighting in Washtenaw County

Mark A

Date of Sighting: Thursday, September 11, 2014
Time of Sighting: 11 AM

Washtenaw County

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Canceled wolf hunt draws no howls

The state's recent decision that there will be no wolf hunt in Michigan this year is getting mixed reactions, despite fear in the Upper Peninsula about the predators.

Many U.P. residents have been alarmed by the estimated 636 gray wolves in Michigan and their attacks on game animals, domestic animals and pets. Last year's Nov. 15-Dec. 31 hunt was the first in Michigan in 40 years and resulted in 22 wolves being killed in the U.P., a little more than half of the state target of 43.

But the Michigan Natural Resources Commission decided more than a week ago that it won't hold a wolf hunt this year, even if voters uphold two state laws that allow wolf hunting by approving two referendums on the Nov. 4 ballot. The state's wolf population is down from 658 in 2013 and 687 in 2012, but up significantly from 20 in 1992.

Canceled wolf hunt draws no howls