Monday, February 27, 2012

Wolf Sighting in Marquette County

John T
Marquette, MI

Date of Sighting: Wednesday, February 22, 2012
Time of Sighting: 8am

Marquette County

Most Michiganders like having wolves in their home state | MSU News | Michigan State University

EAST LANSING, Mich. — The overwhelming majority of Michigan residents place value on having wolves in their home state while a small minority would buy a license to hunt them, according to a Michigan State University study.

The survey, which addresses how the state could manage its wolf population now that Canis lupus has been removed from the federal endangered species list, indicates that 82 percent of those surveyed value knowing that there are wolves in Michigan. On the other end of the spectrum, only 14 percent report that they would purchase a license to hunt wolves.

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Much to Learn From What Remains - NYTimes.com

John Vucetich, a wildlife ecologist from Michigan Technological University, leads the wolf-moose Winter Study at Isle Royale National Park.

Much to Learn From What Remains - NYTimes.com

Sunday, February 19, 2012

Coyotes still main deer predator, U.P. study shows - JSOnline

With a recovered gray wolf population and thriving numbers of black bears, coyotes and bobcats, predators are one of the most common topics of conversation among Wisconsin hunters and wildlife watchers.

The question is often asked: What predator is the most significant cause of deer mortality in Wisconsin?

The Department of Natural Resources embarked on a pair of deer research projects in 2010 that will add facts to the conversation.

The first-year report is due to be released soon.

But a study in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan has been under way for three years and has produced several preliminary reports.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Living with wolves | Michigan Radio

Gray wolves in the western Great Lakes were recently taken off the endangered species list. Now, the state of Michigan is responsible for managing the wolf population.

Michael Nelson is a professor of environmental ethics at Michigan State University. He’s an author of a new report on people’s attitudes about wolves in Michigan. His report is based on a statewide telephone survey conducted in 2010.

Nelson says they asked people throughout the state how they felt about the following four statements (on a five point scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree):

The Environment Report: Living with Wolves

Gray wolves in the western Great Lakes were recently taken off the endangered species list. Now, the state of Michigan is responsible for managing the wolf population.

Michael Nelson is an associate professor of environmental ethics and philosophy at Michigan State University. He’s an author of a new report on people’s attitudes about wolves in Michigan. So, your report is based on a statewide telephone survey. What’d you find out?

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

What life off of the Endangered Species List could mean for Michigan wolves | Michigan Radio

As of last Friday, wolves in Michigan are no longer a federally protected “endangered species.”

On December 21, 2011 Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced in Washington that Gray wolf populations in the Western Great Lakes states of Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin have exceeded recovery goals and are stable enough to be removed from the Endangered Species List.

The current populations in each state are:

Minnesota - 2,921 wolves
Wisconsin - 782 wolves
Michigan's Upper Peninsula - 687 wolves
Even though the de-listing announcement was made last December, protection of the species didn’t officially transfer to the states until January 27, 2012.

Today, wolves in Michigan are a state "protected species."